Month: February 2015

Book Review: On Such a Full Sea

Most apocalyptic authors do not posses the creativity or desire to end their novel outside the standard normal tropes: a protagonist who submits to his (and it rather often seems to be “his”) malevolent overlords either through acquiescence or death, or else a plot that simply doesn’t bother with catharsis at all. So I was never a big fan of this genre, and that’s largely Aldous Huxley’s fault. (Random fact: Huxley wrote the original screenplay for Disney’s adaptation of Alice in Wonderland. Disney rejected it on the grounds that it was too literary. I feel Walt on that one.) The Host is a great exception. Yep, that’s the one written by Stephanie Meyer, who when she’s not writing about sparkly teenage vampires actually has quite a graphic imagination. If you’re looking for somewhat-lighter adult apocalyptic lit, go read it. If you’re looking for something a bit darker, I’d start with Chang-Rae Lee.

Film Review: Amira & Sam

I love romantic comedies. Like sitcoms, I believe the romcom has that special, low-budget power to stretch Hollywood’s narrow beliefs of who might be portrayed on screen. Unlike sitcoms, however, romantic comedies usually do not. Amira & Sam, directed by Sean Mullin, is a film in the tradition of the romantic comedy. As in any good romcom, the movie chronicles the intersection of the lives of two people in love:

Comics Review: My Japanese Husband (STILL) Thinks I’m Crazy

My Japanese Husband Thinks I’m Crazy and the forthcoming followup, My Japanese Husband (STILL) Thinks I’m Crazy are a series of comic books by Grace Buchele Mineta, an American blogger and freelance writer living with her Japanese husband in Tokyo. Mineta explores the humor and small insights to be found in her day-to-day life through her endearing, largely single-panel comics, complemented by explanations of expat life in Japan.

TV Review: Fresh Off The Boat

ABC’s newest sitcom Fresh Off The Boat kicked off yesterday with a double header. The show is based on the memoir of the real-life Eddie Huang, who growing up in the 1990s was obsessed with hip hop and struggling to fit in. The pilot follows Eddie’s Taiwanese American family as they move from the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area to the (far less diverse) city of Orlando, Florida.